Automate All The Things! Reviewed

Exhibitions
Sebastian Schmieg, I Will Say Whatever You Want In Front Of A Pizza, 2017. Screenshot.

A nice review of the Automate All The Things! symposium in Ljubljana, written by writer and curator Aude Launay, is now available on the Frech free magazine 02, both in print (Spring 2020, pp. 88 – 89) and online. Held on January 14 and 15, 2020 at the The Academy of Fine Arts and Moderna galerija, Ljubljana, Automate All The Things! is part of Hyperemployment programme.

“At the end of 2006, when everyone was starting to benefit from their 15 minutes of pixelated celebrity with the advent of the social network that we know, another platform was making a place for itself on another market, not that of hyper-individualization but, on the contrary, of the invisibilization of individuals, turning them into a crowd of  anonymous dogsbodies exploited at will: Amazon Mechanical Turk. This “global, on-demand, 24×7 workforce,” as the website of the giant of the neo-gig economy1proclaims, is conceived as an actualization of the deception that was already simulating artificial intelligence in 1770,the famous Mechanical Turk who amazed the European elite by surpassing them in chess. Two and a half centuries later, artificial intelligence is still artificial and humans are still in the machine.Total automation remains a trick, so what has changed?It is around this question of humans “as invisible slaves of the machines” that curators Domenico Quaranta and Janez Janša brought together a panel of artist-researchers for an exciting symposium in mid-January, as part of the the year-long Hyperemployment programme they are organising for Aksioma, the ultra-dynamic project space in Ljubljana.” Go on reading on 02 magazine’s website.

Between Hype Cycles and the Present Shock

Texts

Soon available as part of the Macro Asilo Diario series, Between Hype Cycles and the Present Shock is an excerpt from a longer, unpublished essay born out of a conference I had in Rome in March 2019, wondering if, and how, art can exist in the present time. The longer version includes chapters about net.art’s futurism, post internet’s presentism, precorporation, media obsolescence, artificial intelligence and virtual reality. If you want to read the draft or suggest a publisher, please drop me a line. This shorter version suffers a bit in the last part, but it features one of my favorite chapters, about the end of the future. Hoping it could be a good companion in these days of anxiety and loneliness, I shared it on Academia. Enjoy!

“We know we are living an age that is profoundly different from that in which contemporary art was born: an age of acceleration, present shock, distracted gaze and end of the future. And yet, when it comes to art, we still confront it as if nothing had actually changed.
Rather than providing answers, this essay raises questions such as: is it still possible to make art under these conditions, and to experience art as it should? What’s the price we have to pay for engaging today’s media and the crucial issues of our time, in terms of duration and long term appreciation?”

Reality is Overrated. When Media Go Beyond Simulation

Texts

I’m happy to announce that an old – but hopefully still fresh – text of mine has been re-published in the amazing Flatland Reader, a publication from O Fluxo presenting “a collection of art and essays that analyzes today’s post-digital conditions for critical media and artistic practice — the act of blurring the boundaries between the physical and the digital by staking out new paths for understanding and working in the transversal territories bounded by theory, internet, and art.”

The Flatland Reader is available in print on demand on Blurb. “Reality is Overrated. When Media Go Beyond Simulation” can still be read online on Artpulse‘s website, where it was originally published; but I strongly suggest to buy the reader for the great graphic design and the amazing company. The list of participants includes Aaron Graham, Anne de Vries, Brad Troemel, Christopher LG Hill, Constant Dullaart, Couple (Adam Cruces & Louisa Gagliardi), Domenico Quaranta, Ed Fornieles, Harm van den Dorpel, Jon Rafman, Keith J. Varadi, Rafaël Rozendaal, Antoine Donzeaud, Bora Akinciturk, Hotel Art (Loney Abrams & Johnny Stanish), Ilya Smirnov, Jack Self, Jakub Choma, Konstanet (Keiu Krikmann & Epp Olekõrs), Matthew Raviotta, Michael Assiff, Natalya Serkova, New Scenario (Paul Barsch & Tilman Hornig), Nuno Patrício, PANE Project (Lucia Leuci), Ricardo Martins, Something Must Break (Monia Ben Hamouda & Michele Gabriele), Sydney (Conor O’Shea), Timur Si-Qin, The Swan Station (Luca Pozzi), 63rd-77th STEPS (Fabio Santacroce), Vaida Stepanovaite and Zoë De Luca.

In che modo oggi gli artisti usano Internet nelle loro opere?

Texts
DISNOVATION.ORG, Shanzhai Archeology, 2015-2018. Courtesy: the artists. Photo: Seraina Wirz. Installation view, exhibition Escaping the Digital Unease at Kunsthaus Langenthal, 2017

Valentina Tanni. L’uso artistico delle reti telematiche ha una lunga storia, che ha avuto il suo picco con il movimento della Net Art nella seconda metà degli Anni Novanta e primi Anni Zero. Esaurita la spinta avanguardistica, e dissolti movimenti e correnti (compreso il controverso Post-Internet), cosa resta oggi? In che modo oggi gli artisti usano Internet nelle loro opere?

Domenico Quaranta. Da un lato il Post-Internet ha cancellato con un colpo di spugna gli ultimi residui della specificità mediale, facilitando l’emergere di artisti che portano i linguaggi e le culture digitali davanti a un pubblico più ampio, trasversale e globale. Per molti aspetti positivo, questo processo ha però danneggiato la riconoscibilità del fenomeno e la compattezza della comunità che l’ha fatto fiorire, riconducendola alle dinamiche individualiste del mondo dell’arte.
Tuttavia sono restio a vedere in questa transizione un passaggio senza ritorno. Le pratiche di networking e la Rete come piattaforma produttiva e distributiva sfidano ancora i formati e le logiche del mondo dell’arte; e, nonostante i suoi cambiamenti, la Rete non ha ancora smesso di sorprendere: blockchain, browser alternativi, mesh network, bot e intelligenze artificiali, deep web, residui strutturali della vecchia Internet lasciano aperti degli spazi a un uso dal basso, radicale e corrosivo delle reti.

In Valentina Tanni, “Internet e gli artisti. L’opinione di 5 esperti”, Artribune, January 30, 2020.

Talk to Me by Jonas Lund

Texts
Jonas Lund, Talk to Me, 2019. 36 volumes, 740 pages each, available in hardcover and softcover. Produced on the occasion of Hyperemployment. Book Design: Federico Antonini (superness.info); Editorial Advisory: Domenico Quaranta. Available here

On October 21, 2017, at 6:17 PM, Jonas reached out to me with a proposal: to turn his online piece, Talk to Me, launched a few months before, into a book. According to the official text, “Talk to Me is a conversational chatbot, […] trained and modelled on all previous instant message conversations (Skype, WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger) as typed by the artist himself to create a smart, machine-learned, automatically talking version of the artist.” But in reality, Jonas told me, “it’s just me typing the answers through a Telegram bot, so each time someone uses the website I get a message on my phone and I answer.”